‘Open communication’ is a top perk for millennials


Millennials aren’t nearly as enigmatic as some people say.

Flighty, perhaps, smartphone-obsessed, you bet, but when it comes to work
perks, millennials are not unlike other humans. According to a
survey of millennial workers conducted by 15Five, 81 percent said they’d rather work for a company that “values open
communication” than a business that offers perks like great health
insurance, gym memberships or free food.

Unfortunately, a mere 15 percent of survey respondents indicated their
current company cultivates an atmosphere of honesty and constructive
two-way conversation. What’s to blame? The infographic points out the
“generational divide,” which frequently causes miscommunication and
conflict.

According to the graphic, 40 percent of millennials say, “Boomers and Gen
Xers are more guarded and less open.” Thirty-eight percent of Boomers,
however, view millennials as “more honest but sometimes too brash and
opinionated.”

[FREE GUIDE: 2016-2017 Internal Communications Survey Results]

Millennials also tend to prefer indirect forms of communications, such as
texting, posting on social media or emailing. Boomers often prefer phone
calls and face-to-face chats. Thus, all too often, the twain shan’t meet.

Another barrier to better internal communication is that certain employees
rarely speak up. The infographic states:

Forty percent share their ideas for improving their roles/job performance
just a few times a year or less.

Other roadblocks to better communication with managers include:

  • Thirty-one percent cite a lack of transparency from higher-ups.
  • Twenty-four percent say their managers are too busy to listen.
  • Twenty-three percent say their managers are simply not good at
    communicating.

It’s an age-old problem. How do you get a bunch of dissimilar people to row
in the same direction? Regardless of age, it starts—and ends—with better
communication. Check out the rest of the infographic below for more ideas
on how to improve this essential business element.

Workplace Communication WEB



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